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UCL Home  /  Geography  /  Research  /  Research Centres  /  Migration Research Unit

Migration Research Unit

About the Unit

MRU LogoThe Migration Research Unit (MRU) is a critical nexus for research on migration across UCL and includes as members researchers from the department of geography and from across the social sciences and humanities at UCL.  MRU members’ ongoing research contributes to key debates pertaining to diasporas and transnationalism, asylum and refugees, national and international migration policies, theorising movement and (im)mobilities, development and migration, and measuring and mapping migration.

The MRU was established by Professor John Salt in 1988, and currently brings together academics whose research also directly informs their teaching and supervision of research students, including students taking MSc Global Migration. The MRU hosts an annual student conference, and regularly organises seminars and conferences to engage with and advance understandings of experiences and processes of and responses to different forms of migration.

The MRU leads UCL's interdisciplinary research network on displacement and conflict, Refuge in a Moving World, which is an initiative of the UCL Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS) in collaboration with the Institute of Global Prosperity (IGP). Refuge in a Moving World draws together experts on displacement, refugees and conflict from across UCL and coordinates conferences, seminars, and public events to promote a research-led conversation on these complex issues. The Refuge in a Moving World network is also coordinating a series of activities across UCL in support of refugees and forced migrants.

Research

Zimbabwean protest in London over right to work2019 -Beacon Mbiba.jpg

The Migration Research Unit is home to a number of research projects, the interdisciplinary research network Refuge in a Moving World and the MSc in Global Migration, all of which specialise in migration related issues. For more information follow the links below:

Research Projects

Making Suburban Faith

Local Community Experiences of Displacement from Syria

Refuge in a Moving World

See the RiMW Directory of Experts and Projects here.

MSc Global Migration

For information relating to this innovative and interdisciplinary Masters, follow this link.

Members

Co-Directors of the MRU

Claire specialises in transnationalism and diaspora identities with a particular interest in faith and migration.

E-mail: claire.dwyer@ucl.ac.uk

Elena specialises in forced migration and conflict-induced displacement, with a particular thematic interest in gender, generation and religion, and a regional focus on the Middle East and North Africa. She is currently the PI of two major projects: Local Experiences of Displacement from Syria (AHRC-ESRC, 2016-2020) and Analysing South-South Humanitarian Responses to Displacement from Syria: Views from Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey (European Research Council, 2017-2022). She is also the Director of UCL's Refuge in a Moving World network.

E-mail: e.fiddian-qasmiyeh@ucl.ac.uk

John specialises in international migration in Europe and the United Kingdom and his major fields of interest are highly skilled migration, and human smuggling and trafficking.

E-mail: j.salt@ucl.ac.uk

 

UCL Members

(see here for a list of UCL researchers focusing on refugees and displacement)

Tom Bailey, MRU Leverhulme Artist in Residence: Tom is a theatre maker and director. Creating work through his company, The Mechanical Animal Corporation, he has developed work across the UK, and internationally in Egypt and Finland. He read English at UCL (2007). In 2016 he was making theatre with refugees in the Good Chance theatre in the Calais 'Jungle'. During his residency with the Migration Research Unit Tom will be researching and developing work that explores migration through live performance. As part of his residency, Tom will be running a series of workshops around his research, and presenting a developmental performance of 'Zugunruhe' later in 2017.

Victoria Bauer, Research Officer: Victoria is responsible for producing the quantitative sections of the annual SOPEMI report. She also supports various statistical projects and publications as analyst - data manipulation and visualization.
E-mail: v.bauer@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Mette Louise Berg (Social Sciences, UCL): Mette is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Science, Thomas Coram Research Unit at UCL Institute of Education (IOE). She is an anthropologist whose research interests include migration, diasporas and transnationalism; urban diversity; questions of gender, belonging and generation; social memory; Cuba and its diaspora.
E-mail: m.berg@ioe.ac.uk

Dr. Elaine Chase (UCL-Institute of Education): Elaine is Senior Lecturer in Education, Health Promotion and International Development in the Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL-IOE.  Her research interests include the intersection between migration and wellbeing outcomes. Her current research investigates the outcomes for independent migrant and refugee children as they make the transition to ‘adulthood’.
E-mail: e.chase@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Adam Dennett (CASA): Adam is a lecturer in Smart Cities and Urban Analytics in the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA), at UCL. He was the lead research on the migration stream of the Explaining, Modelling & Forecasting Global Dynamics (ENFOLD-ing) project.

Dr. Delan Devakumar (UCL Institute for Global Health): Delan is a clinical lecturer in the UCL Institute for Global Health. He is a medical doctor with experience in clinical paediatrics and public health. His research is on maternal and child health and is part of the Lancet Commission on Migration and Health.
E-mail: d.devakumar@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Janet Dobson (Department of Geography), Honorary Senior Research Associate: Janet specialises in child migration and its implications for the education system, as well as having a wider interest in contemporary international migration in the UK.
E-mail: janet.dobson@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Jo Evans (Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies): Jo Evans has research interests in Spanish film and literature, feminist and psychoanalytical narrative and film theory, theories of space and mobility, national identity and migration.

Dr. Adele Galipo (UCL-Institute of Education): Adele is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Institute of Education whose research interests include transnationalism, diasporas and migrants return; urban diversity; development and humanitarian interventions; and nation-building processes. Her regional focus is the Horn of Africa, particularly the Somali region.
E-mail: a.galipo@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Humera Iqbal (UCL-Institute of Education): Humera is interested in the migration experiences of families and young people, in particular how they engage with institutions in new settings (e.g. through language brokering). Her wider interests include relationships developed in superdiverse and mixed class settings particularly by young people and in relation to parenting and family life (including ethnic-racial socialisation practices and mixed friendships).
E-mail: h.iqbal1@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Tariq Jazeel, Reader in Geography
Tariq’s research is situated at the intersections of cultural geography, postcolonial theory and South Asian Studies. He is interested in the politics of ethnicity and difference in Sri Lanka and the diasporic and transanational forms of South Asian Cultural production.
Email: t.jazeel@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Alan Latham, Senior Lecturer in Geography: Alan is interested in the ways which certain internationally mobile individuals and groups use globalisation – and the transportation and communication networks that sustain it – to create life-projects that are strung across enormous distances.
E-mail: alan.latham@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Veena Meetoo is Research Officer at UCL Institute of Education. Her interests include the intersections of 'race', ethnicity gender and migration, particularly in relation to  South Asian and Muslim girls, and migrant students.
Email: veena.meetoo@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Francesca Meloni (UCL-Institute of Education): Francesca is Research Officer at UCL Institute of Education. She is an anthropologist whose research focuses on migrant young people, precarious status, social belonging, and access to social services.
E-mail: f.meloni@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Richard Mole (SSEES): Richard's research examines the experiences of LGBTQ asylum-seekers/refugees from Russia and other post-Soviet states. It examines the politicisation of non-normative sexual and gender identities in the former USSR, the different forms of persecution by the state and society in the post-Soviet space as well as the narratives LGBTQ asylum-seekers need to produce to make their claims understandable in the West. 
E-mail: r.mole@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Helene Neveu Kringelbach is Lecturer in African Studies at UCL. She has research interests in transnational families, Francophone Africa and arts and migration particularly dance and music.
E-mail: h.neveu@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Marta Niccolai is Teaching Fellow at the Department of Italian. Her research focuses on theatre events performed in war territories, primarily the Middle East, and in Europe, that explore human rights and refugees’ rights. She analyses the methodology applied and how the actor’s body and voice is used to encourage a deeper understanding between geographically and culturally different people who are brought closer by forced migration.
E-mail: marta.niccolai@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Ben Page, Reader in Geography: Ben working on the relationship between migration and international development, particularly in relation to African home associations both in Africa and in the international diaspora. 
E-mail: b.page@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Rachel Rosen (UCL-Institute of Education): Rachel is Lecturer in Childhood in the Department of Social Science at UCL-IOE. Her research interests include global care chains and the political economy of migration; children’s experiences of and participation in migration and care labour; and the intersections of materialist feminist thought and the sociology of childhood. 
E-mail: R.Rosen@ioe.ac.uk

Dr. Uta Staiger (European Institute/History): Uta is co-director of UCL’s European Institute and a teaching fellow in UCL History. She has research interests in German political thought and the role of culture for citizenship and democracy, both in political thought and in policy developments over the course of European integration.

Professor Anne White (SSEES) is Professor of Polish Studies. Anne has particular research interests in Polish migration and circuits of return migration.

Dr Ralph Wilde (UCL-Laws) is an expert in public international law, and also has an interest in the interface between international law and related academic disciplines, including international relations and legal and political theory. His research on migration has included work on UNHCR administration of camps housing refugees and IDPs, and the extraterritorial application of human rights and refugee law in the migration context, from sea-rescues to the extraterritorial posting of border officials.

 

UCL Members: Research Students

Alex Ma: The making of a new Asian tiger? Myanma labour migration to Singapore, and remittance-led development

Khatereh Eghdamian: Rethinking Religion in Humanitarianism beyond Identity Politics: Discursive representations of Syrian refugees and their effects on religious minorities in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.

Suriyah Bi: The Feminisation of Marriage: Ghar Dhamads, Generational Shifts, and Global vs. Local in Birmingham’s British-Pakistani Community

Tom Brocket: Between West Bank and East Coast: Making Palestinian heritage in and from the United States

Laura CuchFood, faith and home: A visual exploration of religious and domestic material culture

Pooya Ghoddousi: Domesticating the self: Nomad citizenship in Transnational Iranian lives

Chia-Yuan HuangGlobal Mobility of Talents: Taiwanese Highly Skilled Migrant Workers to Shanghai and Singapore

Sarah Kunz: Privileged migration: expatriate communities in Cairo and London

Shayan Moftizadeh: Exploring identities among the second generation Kurdish diaspora in the UK

Nadia RobbRomanian migrants and transnationalism

Tatianna Rodrigues: Migration and regional identity in CARICOM: a case study of Guyana and Barbados

Diego Garcia Rodriguez: Queer Indonesian Muslims: Progressive Islam and the Negotiation of LGBT and Muslim Identities

Sainabou Taal: Development and International Migration: understanding the drive for political intervention in the Gambian diaspora

Katy Taylor-Helps: Motherland and Militancy, Giving and Taking Life: Female Perpetration of Proscribed Violence, and Gendered National Identity Construction in Lebanon and Palestine

Sinthujan Varatharajah: Suspended in this disjunction: the German asylum complex.


Recently Completed PhD Students

Dr Kate Kingsford 2016 'Learning to be a woman: gender and identity in Zanzibar'

Dr Ruth Judge 2016 ' From the council estate to the African Orphanage: the impact of low-income youth’s voluntary encounters overseas on class and race identity'

Dr Gayle Munro 2015 'Transnational lives? The experiences of migrants for the former Yugoslavia in Britain'

Dr Caitlin O’Neil 2014 'Coming of age in the United States, Becoming Mexican(-American): A study of how young Mexican women engage with ideas of womanhood, family and ‘Mexicanness’ in San Diego, California'

Dr Cinzia Polese 2013 'Negotiating Power between Civil Society and the State: the Formulation of Asylum Policies in Italy and in the United Kingdom'

Dr Lauren Wagner 2011 ‘Transnational identities of second generation Moroccans in France and UK’

Dr Ben Lampert 2010 'Diaspora and Development? Nigerian organisations in London and the transnational politics of obligation and belonging'

Dr Lia Schimada 2010 'Transforming Earth and Fire: New narratives of identity and place in the Northern Ireland peace process'

Dr Violetta Parutis 2008 ‘Lithuanian and Polish migrants in London’

Dr Elaine Ho 2007 ‘Singaporean skilled migrants in London’

Magali Moreau '"Cutting the heart of Tanzania?" Refugees, livelihoods and resources: a political ecology of Mtabila camp, Tanzania.'

 

Associate Members

Professor Paul Compton, Honorary Research Fellow: Paul specialises in European demography and international migration in Hungary.

Dr. Paul Densham, Reader in Geography: Paul specialises in Geographical Information Systems.
E-mail: p.densham@ucl.ac.uk

Professor John Eade: John Eade is Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Roehampton University and Executive Director of CRONEM (Centre for Research on Nationalism, Ethnicity and Multiculturalism) at Surrey and Roehampton universities.  John was a visiting Professor in the MRU between 2010-2013.

Dr. Pablo Mateos, Formerly Lecturer in Geography, UCL now Reader in Social Anthropology Research Centre (CIESAS) in Guadalajara, Mexico: Pablo focuses on investigating new ontologies and geographic visualisations of ethnicity, migration and mobility. His recent work has focused on residential segregation, categorisations of ethnicity, the geography of names, and the spatial analysis of populations and neighbourhoods in the UK, Spain, US and Mexico.

Professor Peter Wood, Professor Emeritus in Geography: Peter specialises in the internationalisation of expert labour.
E-mail: peter.wood@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Péter Berta: Péter is Marie Curie Research Fellow at School of Slavonic and East European Studies, UCL (Politics & Sociology) and a senior researcher at the Institute for Ethnology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Budapest). He is an economic and social anthropologist concentrating on Central and Eastern Europe, especially Romania and Hungary.
E-mail: p.berta@ucl.ac.uk

Publications

UCL-Migration-Research-Unit-Policy-Brief---K-Eghdamian-small.jpg
Policy Briefings

Working Papers

Selected Publications by John Salt

MRU Annual Report 2013
MRU Annual Report 2012

News and Events

Forthcoming Events

  • 09 June 2017: 6th Annual MRU Conference to take place at UCL. For information on how to submit a paper please click here.
  • 06 Feb 2017: Tom Bailey, UCL Geography Artist in Residence, will lead a Refugee Theatre Workshopfrom 2-4pm in the Common Ground room, Institute of Advanced Studies, UCL.
  • 13 Feb 2017: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh presenting on 'Humanitarianism, Gender and Religion in Migration' at Regent's Park College, Oxford.
  • 16 Feb 2017: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh contributing to a panel on 'Gender-Based Violence' at the launch of the new UCL Centre for Gender and Global Health
  • 24 Feb 2017: Urban Labs will be hosting a film screening on Committed Ethnographies: a Documentary about Forced Evictions and Resistance in Bucharest in UCL. The Facebook event page can be found here.
  • 14 Mar 2017: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh contributing to a Special Panel Event on 'Development in Crisis: States, Conflicts, Refugees' at the School of Oriental and African Studies.

Latest News

Seminars

Refuge in a Moving World logo.jpg

 

Past Conferences, Events and Workshops

MRU-Stu-Conf-2016-A4-poster-2.jpg

06 Feb 2017: Tom Bailey, UCL Geography Artist in Residence Refugee Theatre Workshop

Events

There are currently no items in this folder.

PDFs

27._UNITED_KINGDOM_Annual_Report_on_Asylum_and_Migration_Statistics_2007_FINAL_Version_March2010.pdf
current_trends_2004.pdf
dobson_report_pupil_mobility_04.pdf
highly_skilled.pdf
HO_routes_final.pdf
migration_types.pdf
on_the_move.pdf
pop_trends.pdf
pupil_mobility00.pdf
sizing_illegal_pop.pdf
Sop09_Final_ONSCmnts_SE.pdf
Sop10_final_2112.pdf
Sop11.pdf
SYDRC May conference report.pdf
UK_patterns_and_trends.pdf
MRU Student Conference A5 booklet 1P.pdf
Neg Rel Workshop 3.pdf
MRU Annual Report 2012 PRINT.pdf
Migration Photo Comp Flyer.pdf
StudentConferenceproceedings2012.pdf
Sopemi Report 2012
Serco Magazine Launch 22 April.pdf
MRU Student Conference 2013 A5 booklet.pdf
MRU Annual Report 2013.pdf
MRU Student Conference 2014 Call for Papers.pdf
Sopemi Report 2013
MRU Student Conference 2014 Poster PRINT.pdf
Migration and homes.pdf
MRU Student Conf - 3 June.pdf
MRU Student Conference Booklet 2014.pdf
Okolski_Salt_Polish_Emigration_to_the_UK.pdf
Sopemi_UK_2014
Call_for_Papers 2015_MRU - 120215.pdf
My Landmark Poster March.pdf
MRU_programme2015 (1).pdf
MRU Stu Conf Booklet 2015.pdf
UCL Migration Research Unit Policy Brief - K Eghdamian.pdf
Sopemi_UK_2015.pdf
RiMW seminar series.pdf
Call for Papers MRU UCL Student Conference 2016_FINAL PDF_2.pdf
Refuge in a Moving World Seminar Series -3.pdf
MRU Stu Conf 2016 A4 poster-2.pdf
Low Res.Gender Religion and Refugees.MRU PB.pdf
Student conference 2016
Sopemi report 2016

News

Nadya Jaworsky - Biography
My Landmark.pdf
My-Landmark.jpg
Gender, Religion and Refugees
New MRU Policy Brief to be launched at the UN Refugee Summit on 19 September
Staff-Student Meeting in Support of Refugees and Migrants
31st October, 9.30am: Open Meeting for Staff and Students in Support of Refugees and Migrants

Discussion Papers

CUTTING NET MIGRATION TO THE TENS OF THOUSANDS: WHAT EXACTLY DOES THAT MEAN?
Discussion Papers
MOJS revise 041114_accept.pdf
Cutting net migration

More about the MRU

Between 2003-2010 research has been conducted under a grant from the Leverhulme Programme on Migration and Citizenship in partnership with the Centre for Ethnicity and Citizenship at the University of Bristol.

Staff in the Migration Research Unit gain funding from a wide range of sources and collaborate with colleagues nationally and internationally. They also have a history of collaboration with UCL Equiano Centre, SEES, UCL Department of Anthropology, CREAM, UCL Institute of Global Health, UCL Urban Lab and UCL Sustainable Cities.

Members of the MRU

Co-Directors of the MRU

Claire specialises in transnationalism and diaspora identities with a particular interest in faith and migration.

E-mail: claire.dwyer@ucl.ac.uk

Elena specialises in forced migration and conflict-induced displacement, with a particular thematic interest in gender, generation and religion, and a regional focus on the Middle East and North Africa. She is currently the PI of two major projects: Local Experiences of Displacement from Syria (AHRC-ESRC, 2016-2020) and Analysing South-South Humanitarian Responses to Displacement from Syria: Views from Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey (European Research Council, 2017-2022). She is also the Director of UCL's Refuge in a Moving World network.

E-mail: e.fiddian-qasmiyeh@ucl.ac.uk

John specialises in international migration in Europe and the United Kingdom and his major fields of interest are highly skilled migration, and human smuggling and trafficking.

E-mail: j.salt@ucl.ac.uk

 

UCL Members

(see here for a list of UCL researchers focusing on refugees and displacement)

Tom Bailey, MRU Leverhulme Artist in Residence: Tom is a theatre maker and director. Creating work through his company, The Mechanical Animal Corporation, he has developed work across the UK, and internationally in Egypt and Finland. He read English at UCL (2007). In 2016 he was making theatre with refugees in the Good Chance theatre in the Calais 'Jungle'. During his residency with the Migration Research Unit Tom will be researching and developing work that explores migration through live performance. As part of his residency, Tom will be running a series of workshops around his research, and presenting a developmental performance of 'Zugunruhe' later in 2017.

Victoria Bauer, Research Officer: Victoria is responsible for producing the quantitative sections of the annual SOPEMI report. She also supports various statistical projects and publications as analyst - data manipulation and visualization.
E-mail: v.bauer@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Mette Louise Berg (Social Sciences, UCL): Mette is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Science, Thomas Coram Research Unit at UCL Institute of Education (IOE). She is an anthropologist whose research interests include migration, diasporas and transnationalism; urban diversity; questions of gender, belonging and generation; social memory; Cuba and its diaspora.
E-mail: m.berg@ioe.ac.uk

Dr. Elaine Chase (UCL-Institute of Education): Elaine is Senior Lecturer in Education, Health Promotion and International Development in the Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL-IOE.  Her research interests include the intersection between migration and wellbeing outcomes. Her current research investigates the outcomes for independent migrant and refugee children as they make the transition to ‘adulthood’.
E-mail: e.chase@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Adam Dennett (CASA): Adam is a lecturer in Smart Cities and Urban Analytics in the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA), at UCL. He was the lead research on the migration stream of the Explaining, Modelling & Forecasting Global Dynamics (ENFOLD-ing) project.

Dr. Delan Devakumar (UCL Institute for Global Health): Delan is a clinical lecturer in the UCL Institute for Global Health. He is a medical doctor with experience in clinical paediatrics and public health. His research is on maternal and child health and is part of the Lancet Commission on Migration and Health.
E-mail: d.devakumar@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Janet Dobson (Department of Geography), Honorary Senior Research Associate: Janet specialises in child migration and its implications for the education system, as well as having a wider interest in contemporary international migration in the UK.
E-mail: janet.dobson@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Jo Evans (Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies): Jo Evans has research interests in Spanish film and literature, feminist and psychoanalytical narrative and film theory, theories of space and mobility, national identity and migration.

Dr. Adele Galipo (UCL-Institute of Education): Adele is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Institute of Education whose research interests include transnationalism, diasporas and migrants return; urban diversity; development and humanitarian interventions; and nation-building processes. Her regional focus is the Horn of Africa, particularly the Somali region.
E-mail: a.galipo@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Humera Iqbal (UCL-Institute of Education): Humera is interested in the migration experiences of families and young people, in particular how they engage with institutions in new settings (e.g. through language brokering). Her wider interests include relationships developed in superdiverse and mixed class settings particularly by young people and in relation to parenting and family life (including ethnic-racial socialisation practices and mixed friendships).
E-mail: h.iqbal1@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Tariq Jazeel, Reader in Geography
Tariq’s research is situated at the intersections of cultural geography, postcolonial theory and South Asian Studies. He is interested in the politics of ethnicity and difference in Sri Lanka and the diasporic and transanational forms of South Asian Cultural production.
Email: t.jazeel@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Alan Latham, Senior Lecturer in Geography: Alan is interested in the ways which certain internationally mobile individuals and groups use globalisation – and the transportation and communication networks that sustain it – to create life-projects that are strung across enormous distances.
E-mail: alan.latham@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Veena Meetoo is Research Officer at UCL Institute of Education. Her interests include the intersections of 'race', ethnicity gender and migration, particularly in relation to  South Asian and Muslim girls, and migrant students.
Email: veena.meetoo@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Francesca Meloni (UCL-Institute of Education): Francesca is Research Officer at UCL Institute of Education. She is an anthropologist whose research focuses on migrant young people, precarious status, social belonging, and access to social services.
E-mail: f.meloni@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Richard Mole (SSEES): Richard's research examines the experiences of LGBTQ asylum-seekers/refugees from Russia and other post-Soviet states. It examines the politicisation of non-normative sexual and gender identities in the former USSR, the different forms of persecution by the state and society in the post-Soviet space as well as the narratives LGBTQ asylum-seekers need to produce to make their claims understandable in the West.
E-mail: r.mole@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Helene Neveu Kringelbach is Lecturer in African Studies at UCL. She has research interests in transnational families, Francophone Africa and arts and migration particularly dance and music.
E-mail: h.neveu@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Marta Niccolai is Teaching Fellow at the Department of Italian. Her research focuses on theatre events performed in war territories, primarily the Middle East, and in Europe, that explore human rights and refugees’ rights. She analyses the methodology applied and how the actor’s body and voice is used to encourage a deeper understanding between geographically and culturally different people who are brought closer by forced migration.
E-mail: marta.niccolai@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Ben Page, Reader in Geography: Ben working on the relationship between migration and international development, particularly in relation to African home associations both in Africa and in the international diaspora. 
E-mail: b.page@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Rachel Rosen (UCL-Institute of Education): Rachel is Lecturer in Childhood in the Department of Social Science at UCL-IOE. Her research interests include global care chains and the political economy of migration; children’s experiences of and participation in migration and care labour; and the intersections of materialist feminist thought and the sociology of childhood.
E-mail: R.Rosen@ioe.ac.uk

Dr. Uta Staiger (European Institute/History): Uta is co-director of UCL’s European Institute and a teaching fellow in UCL History. She has research interests in German political thought and the role of culture for citizenship and democracy, both in political thought and in policy developments over the course of European integration.

Professor Anne White (SSEES) is Professor of Polish Studies. Anne has particular research interests in Polish migration and circuits of return migration.

Dr Ralph Wilde (UCL-Laws) is an expert in public international law, and also has an interest in the interface between international law and related academic disciplines, including international relations and legal and political theory. His research on migration has included work on UNHCR administration of camps housing refugees and IDPs, and the extraterritorial application of human rights and refugee law in the migration context, from sea-rescues to the extraterritorial posting of border officials.

 

UCL Members: Research Students

Alex Ma: The making of a new Asian tiger? Myanma labour migration to Singapore, and remittance-led development

Khatereh Eghdamian: Rethinking Religion in Humanitarianism beyond Identity Politics: Discursive representations of Syrian refugees and their effects on religious minorities in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.

Suriyah Bi: The Feminisation of Marriage: Ghar Dhamads, Generational Shifts, and Global vs. Local in Birmingham’s British-Pakistani Community

Tom Brocket: Between West Bank and East Coast: Making Palestinian heritage in and from the United States

Laura Cuch: Food, faith and home: A visual exploration of religious and domestic material culture

Pooya Ghoddousi: Domesticating the self: Nomad citizenship in Transnational Iranian lives

Chia-Yuan Huang: Global Mobility of Talents: Taiwanese Highly Skilled Migrant Workers to Shanghai and Singapore

Sarah Kunz: Privileged migration: expatriate communities in Cairo and London

Shayan Moftizadeh: Exploring identities among the second generation Kurdish diaspora in the UK

Nadia Robb: Romanian migrants and transnationalism

Tatianna Rodrigues: Migration and regional identity in CARICOM: a case study of Guyana and Barbados

Diego Garcia Rodriguez: Queer Indonesian Muslims: Progressive Islam and the Negotiation of LGBT and Muslim Identities

Sainabou Taal: Development and International Migration: understanding the drive for political intervention in the Gambian diaspora

Katy Taylor-Helps: Motherland and Militancy, Giving and Taking Life: Female Perpetration of Proscribed Violence, and Gendered National Identity Construction in Lebanon and Palestine

Sinthujan Varatharajah: Suspended in this disjunction: the German asylum complex.


Recently Completed PhD Students

Dr Kate Kingsford 2016 'Learning to be a woman: gender and identity in Zanzibar'

Dr Ruth Judge 2016 ' From the council estate to the African Orphanage: the impact of low-income youth’s voluntary encounters overseas on class and race identity'

Dr Gayle Munro 2015 'Transnational lives? The experiences of migrants for the former Yugoslavia in Britain'

Dr Caitlin O’Neil 2014 'Coming of age in the United States, Becoming Mexican(-American): A study of how young Mexican women engage with ideas of womanhood, family and ‘Mexicanness’ in San Diego, California'

Dr Cinzia Polese 2013 'Negotiating Power between Civil Society and the State: the Formulation of Asylum Policies in Italy and in the United Kingdom'

Dr Lauren Wagner 2011 ‘Transnational identities of second generation Moroccans in France and UK’

Dr Ben Lampert 2010 'Diaspora and Development? Nigerian organisations in London and the transnational politics of obligation and belonging'

Dr Lia Schimada 2010 'Transforming Earth and Fire: New narratives of identity and place in the Northern Ireland peace process'

Dr Violetta Parutis 2008 ‘Lithuanian and Polish migrants in London’

Dr Elaine Ho 2007 ‘Singaporean skilled migrants in London’

Magali Moreau '"Cutting the heart of Tanzania?" Refugees, livelihoods and resources: a political ecology of Mtabila camp, Tanzania.'

 

Associate Members

Professor Paul Compton, Honorary Research Fellow: Paul specialises in European demography and international migration in Hungary.

Dr. Paul Densham, Reader in Geography: Paul specialises in Geographical Information Systems.
E-mail: p.densham@ucl.ac.uk

Professor John Eade: John Eade is Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Roehampton University and Executive Director of CRONEM (Centre for Research on Nationalism, Ethnicity and Multiculturalism) at Surrey and Roehampton universities.  John was a visiting Professor in the MRU between 2010-2013.

Dr. Pablo Mateos, Formerly Lecturer in Geography, UCL now Reader in Social Anthropology Research Centre (CIESAS) in Guadalajara, Mexico: Pablo focuses on investigating new ontologies and geographic visualisations of ethnicity, migration and mobility. His recent work has focused on residential segregation, categorisations of ethnicity, the geography of names, and the spatial analysis of populations and neighbourhoods in the UK, Spain, US and Mexico.

Professor Peter Wood, Professor Emeritus in Geography: Peter specialises in the internationalisation of expert labour.
E-mail: peter.wood@ucl.ac.uk

Dr. Péter Berta: Péter is Marie Curie Research Fellow at School of Slavonic and East European Studies, UCL (Politics & Sociology) and a senior researcher at the Institute for Ethnology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Budapest). He is an economic and social anthropologist concentrating on Central and Eastern Europe, especially Romania and Hungary.
E-mail: p.berta@ucl.ac.uk

Current and Recent Research

  • Migration policy development in OECD countries, 2010, OECD.

  • Research and international corporate mobility, 2009, Leverhulme Programme.

  • Economic downturn and recession, 2009.

  • International students and the UK labour market, 2006-08, Leverhulme Programme.

  • The New Zimbabwean Diaspora: Inclusion and Exclusion in the UK’ (ESRC 2004-5)
  • National Identity, Citizenship and Religious ‘Difference’, Leverhulme Programme, 2007-9
  • Highly skilled migrants and the movement of expertise, Leverhulme programme, 2004-05
  • Gender, social capital and differential outcomes, Leverhulme programme, 2004-05
  • Migrant trafficking and human smuggling between Pakistan/Afghanistan and the United Kingdom, Leverhulme programme, 2003-04
  • Types of international migration and their impacts, Council of Europe, 2005.
  • Pupil Mobility in Secondary Schools, Nuffield Foundation, 2002-04
  • PEMINT, EU 5th Framework, 2001-2003.
  • International migration and the United Kingdom, UK SOPEMI correspondents report to the OECD, 1985-2010 (annual).
  • Current Trends in European International Migration, Council of Europe, 1991-2006.
  • Work permits database, Home Office, 2002
  • Sizing the illegal population, Home Office, 2002
  • Irregular migration flows in Europe, Home Office/IOM, 2001-02
  • European Migration Information Network (EMIN), European Commission funding 1999-2001.
  • Low skilled migration into the UK, Home Office, 2001.
  • Skilled migration into the UK, Home Office, 2001.
  • Social networks of asylum seekers, Home Office, 2001.
  • Return and reintegration of rejected asylum seekers, IOM, 2000-01.
  • UK Immigration Policy: the Challenges to Come, Home Office, 2000-01.
  • Trafficking in migrants, International Organisation for Migration, 1999.
  • Pupil mobility in schools, DfEE and Nuffield Foundation, 1999-2000.
  • National conditions of entry for certain types of migrants, European Commission, 1999-2000.
  • Free movement of labour in Europe, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1999.
  • Labour migration impacts of EU enlargement, Department for Education and Employment, 1999.
  • Transnational exile communities and post-conflict reconstruction, ESRC, 1998-2001.
  • Patterns and trends of European international migration, European Commission, 1998-9.
  • Foreign workers in Europe, extension to database, European Commission, 1997.
  • Creation of database on international migration in Central and Eastern Europe, European Commission.
  • Creation of database on acquisition of citizenship, European Commission, 1996.
  • Enhancement of Eurostat international migration stocks and labour database, European Commission, 1996-97.
  • Feasibility study for a European Racism and Xenophobia Observatory, European Commission, 1996.
  • Enhancement of Eurostat international migration flows database, European Commission, 1995-96.
  • European migration statistics update, Home office, 1995.
  • Posted workers in Europe, Department of Employment, 1995.
  • Feasibility study for a European Migration Observatory, European Commission, 1995-96.
  • International migration of the highly skilled, OECD, 1994.
  • Analysis and forecasting of international migration, Eurostat, European Commission, 1994.
  • Enhanced database for international migration, Eurostat, European Commission, 1993-94.
  • Comparison of data sources relating to international migration in the EC, Eurostat, European Commission, 1992-93.
  • Contemporary international migration in Europe, Home Office, 1992-93.
  • Foreign labour immigration in the U.K. Department of Employment, 1988-89.

Leverhulme Programme

The Leverhulme Trust has awarded a grant of over a million pounds to a joint research programme of the Bristol University Research Centre for the Study of Ethnicity and Citizenship, hosted by the Department of Sociology, and the Migration Research Unit, based in the Department of Geography, University College London.

This joint Programme, consists of eight linked projects over 5 years, which commenced in April 2003, and looks at three elements in human mobility and its consequences:

  • The diversity of movements of people today: these vary by motive for moving, length of stay, occasional or terminal return to the country of origin, onward movements to other destinations and so on. One project will study human smuggling and trafficking-networks between Pakistan and Britain, and several other projects will focus on the neglected topic of highly skilled migrants. Increasing sectors of employment, often dominated by large transnational corporations for whom movement of staff is routine, are being globalised and a new elite of internationalised workers has emerged. One of the sectors that will be investigated is the staffing and student recruitment of UK higher education. Another project will consider how far various types of movement are substituting for each other in the mobility of human expertise.
  • Settlement issues of previous generation(s) of migrants and descendants. One project, utilising the 2001 Census, will explore the thesis that residential concentration amongst ethnic minorities is no longer necessarily associated with socio-economic disadvantage, but is a reflection of the relaxation of the pressures of assimilation. Another project will explore the utility of the concept of social capital by studying the reproduction of community across generations and by gender in two Pakistani communities.
  • Impact on and interaction with the 'receiving' societies. Two projects will look at aspects of contemporary British and English national identities in the light of migration and associated changes. One project will look at how religious difference is being represented in national identity discourses. The other project will focus on how white English views of national identity vary by class.

This Programme will be co-directed by Professor Tariq Modood (Bristol) and Professor John Salt (UCL). Other team members are Professor Steve Fenton, Professor Ron Johnston and Dr Suruchi Thapar-Bjorkert (Bristol), and Dr Claire Dwyer (UCL).

The Leverhulme Trust was established in 1925 under the Will of the first Lord Leverhulme - William Hesketh Lever - the entrepreneur and philanthropist who established Lever Brothers in the late nineteenth century. The Trust provides some £25million each year to promote research of originality and significance principally in the university sector across a full span of disciplines.

For more information, please visit the Programme's main website.

Postgraduate Studies

Applications are welcomed from graduate students wanting to pursue a PhD in the fields of migration, transnationalism and disasporas. Areas of interest include:

  • Asylum and Refugees
  • Migration by the Highly Skilled
  • Brain Drains, Gains and Exchanges
  • Return Migration
  • The Migration of Children
  • Migration Information Systems
  • Labour Migration
  • Migrant Trafficking and Human Smuggling
  • Transnationalism and diaspora identities and networks
  • Residential Segregation
  • Ethnicity classifications and statistics
  • Spatial analysis of ethnicity, migration and mobility

 

Potential students should first contact the staff member of the MRU whose research most matches their own interests or email geog-mru@ucl.ac.uk.

For further details of postgraduate funding and applications procedures see the postgraduate pages on the main geography website.

Vacancies

There are currently no vacancies in the Migration Research Unit.

Publications

For up-to-date lists of the publications of members of the MRU please refer to their individual home pages
New publications

 

      Other publications
        Downloadable reports and papers
        Discussion papers

        Contact Us

        If you require further information, please contact us:

        Email

      • geog-mru@ucl.ac.uk

      •  

        Postal Address

      • Migration Research Unit

        Department of Geography

        University College London

        26 Bedford Way

        London WC1H 0AP

        United Kingdom

      •  

        Telephone/Fax

         

      • tel: +44-20-7679-7569

      • fax: +44-20-7679-7565

      •  

        Student Action for Refugees

        UCL STAR is part of a national network of student groups working to improve the lives of refugees and asylum seekers in the UK by:

        • promoting a positive images of refugees and asylum seekers;
        • raising awarenes of difficulties faced by those seeking asylum in the UK;
        • volunteering for local refugee projects;
        • campaigning on behalf refugees and asylum seekers.

         

        The UCL branch of STAR will focus its campaigning efforts on the issues of destitution of refugees and asylum seekers, deportation of minors to regions of conflict and the negative impacts of immigration detention. The society will organise a number of guest speaker events, debates and letter signing campaigns as well as more practical actions such as collections of clothes and toys for refugees and asylum seekers living in poverty.

        To find out more about the society please email Audrey Ryback on audrey.ryback.14@ucl.ac.uk. You can also find out more on the society's facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/UCL-STAR/346500012061341 and by following @UCLStar

        Migration, Human Rights and Security in Europe

        MRU Student Conference Including a presentation by Bail for Immigration Detainees (BID) 11th June 2012, University College London (UCL) Registration is now open!

        Migration is one of the top issues on the policy agenda in Europe and is regularly debated on national and EU-wide level. Fears about illegal migration, and the association of migrants with terrorism, extremism and crime have led to increased securitisation of migration in “Fortress Europe” and the introduction of tougher admission and control policies.

        The recent developments have caused concerns among human rights advocates and migrant communities over the potential erosion of migrants’ human rights. National and international courts, in particular the European Court of Human Rights, are increasingly being asked to comment on the relationship between human rights obligations and the treatment of migrants by states. The different points of view clash in a heated debate around the continent which is unlikely to end anytime soon.

        ‘Migration, Human Rights and Security in Europe’ is a student conference organised in collaboration with the Migration Research Unit and the Institute for Human Rights at UCL in order to encourage students from different disciplines to share their current research in this area. The event aims to provide a forum for an exchange of ideas and knowledge between students from across London (and beyond) working on these issues.

        Themes will include:

        - irregular migration

        - immigration detention

        - extraterritorial border control in the EU

        - migration, counter-terrorism and security

        - the right to health

        - protection of vulnerable groups

        The conference will conclude with a talk by Pierre Makhlouf, Assistant Director of BID (Bail for Immigration Detainees), one of UK's leading charities working in the immigration field. He will talk about when immigration detention becomes unlawful, and discuss some of BID's recent strategic litigation and policy work in this area.

        To register please email: mrustudentconference@gmail.com.

        Registration closes on 7th May. Please note that participants will be asked to pay a £8 conference fee which will cover all conference materials as well as lunch and refreshments during the day.

        To get updates about the conference please go to:

        http://www.facebook.com/pages/MRU-Student-Conference-Migration-Human-Rights-and-Security-in-Europe/395025877177887

        Policy Briefings

        How to Cope with the Highest Rate of Refugees per Capita in the World? Lessons from Lebanon. By Dr. Nasser Yassin

        When Nov 28, 2016
        from 01:00 PM to 02:00 PM
        Contact Name
        Add event to calendar vCal
        iCal

        How to Cope with the Highest Rate of Refugees per Capita in the World? Lessons from Lebanon

        Dr. Nasser Yassin (American University of Beirut)

        28 November, 1-2pm; Room 113, 26 Bedford Way

        Special Refuge in a Moving World Seminar

        All Welcome

        Abstract: Since the beginning of the Syrian civil war more than five years ago, Lebanon has received around 1.5 million refugees. They currently make up around 25% of the country’s population, the highest rate of refugee per capita in the world. The vast majority of those refugees are destitute with 54% of them relying on food vouchers. Yet, and in the midst of a protracted political crisis in Lebanon the country hasn’t imploded.

        What are the lessons from Lebanon, and how it has been coping?

        In his talk, Nasser Yassin will address these critical questions and will reflect on the historical, social and economic factors that have helped Lebanon handle, so far, the largest refugee crisis since World War 2.  He will argue that ‘informal adaptive institutions’ have played a significant role in maintaining the resilience of refugees and their host communities. Based on his research in Lebanon and across the Middle East, he will show that although informal institutions are not recognized by the state and are often neglected by the formal response and humanitarian system, have emerged as major coping strategies for refugees in accessing essential social services and livelihoods.

         

        Bio: Dr. Nasser Yassin is the Director of Research at the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs, and professor of policy and planning at the Health Management and Policy Department at the American University of Beirut (AUB), Lebanon. He co-chairs the AUB4Refugees Initiative that aims to bring together and build synergy among faculty and departments in AUB responding to the Syrian refugee crisis. He holds a PhD from University College London (UCL), an MSc from London School of Economics (LSE), and an MSc and BSc from the American University of Beirut (AUB). His research and practice interests are in development planning and policy-making in fragile states. His work looks at how civil society actors, community groups and informal networks can influence policies as well as development and humanitarian programs. He is currently leading a research project on understanding the informal adaptive mechanisms among refugees and their host communities in the Middle East. He is author of more than 30 internationally published articles and reports. You can follow him on @nasseryassin

        Dynamic Meeting Confirms Committment to Support Refugees and Migrants at UCL

        Dynamic Staff and Student Meeting Confirms Commitment to Support Refugees and Migrants at UCL

        On Monday 31st October, 45 students and staff attended a lively Open Meeting to coordinate activities in support of refugees and migrants at UCL and to consider the work that lies ahead to enhance access to higher education.

        A coordinating group from Refuge in a Moving World presented key proposals currently under consideration by Professor Anthony Smith (Vice Provost of Education & Student Affairs). These proposals were developed based on extensive consultation and the efforts of a committed group of UCL staff and students, following a successful Open Meeting in February 2016. The initiatives were fully discussed and there was clear support for the proposed agenda, with productive additional suggestions emerging in the discussion.

        Proposed initiatives include:

        1. Establishment of a ‘Migration Support Unit’ and ‘Forced Migrant Champions’ to coordinate, oversee and embed activities across UCL;
        2. Recruitment and funding for students who are forced migrants to access UCL Undergraduate Preparatory Certificate pre-undergraduate foundation courses
        3. Review and enhancement of current scholarship provision with specific focus on a fair and sustainable scholarship programme for refugees and migrants at all levels, from foundation courses to academic fellowships
        4. Familiarisation with HE volunteer taught programme: a non-selective pre-foundation information and orientation  programme open to all displaced people in London regardless of immigration status - in coordination with STAR and staff and student volunteers.
        Meeting participants agreed that the proposal would draw together and maximise capacity and expertise at UCL, given the considerable activity happening already across UCL departments and student groups. The proposal was seen to offer a solid framework for taking a formal public position consistent with the UCL's mission and an unmet need in the capital.

        The main part of the meeting focussed on how to move forward on the proposed initiatives and others. The group generated wide-ranging, creative and practical ideas including:

        · Continuing to foster collaborations with UCL programmes (e.g. Global Citizenship), departments, and student groups (e.g. the new Refugee Support Group), as well as community /national organisations working with displaced peoples
        · Ensuring maximum inclusivity, for example by linking with LGBT+ groups
        · Learning from cross-national experiences, for example in Germany or Sweden
        · Developing MOOCs for people in refugee camps and host cities in the Global South
        · Working with UCL Academy to support access for refugee/asylum-seeking students

        As one meeting participant observed: "Universities are places dedicated to thinking, but now is the time to act!"

        The next Working Committee Meeting will be held on 23 November, from 12.30-13.30 in Room 301 of the Pearson Building and a larger Open Meeting will be held in the Spring.

        You can view a copy of the presentation shown at the Open Meeting, and can access a list of existing refugee-related networks, groups and opportunities for volunteering that exist across UCL, here.
        For more information and/or to get involved, contact Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Coordinator of the Refuge in a Moving World research network, by email on e.fiddian-qasmiyeh@ucl.ac.uk.

        RiMW Activities: 2015-2016

        Refuge in a Moving World Activities in 2015-2016

        This UCL-wide research network was launched in November 2015 with a Refuge in a Moving World Roundtable which drew together 4 leading academics from across UCL with wide-ranging expertise relating to conflict, crisis and (forced) migration in Africa, the Middle East and Europe, to explore questions relating to the wellbeing of individuals and communities affected by conflict and displacement; the implications of mass migration for the socio-economic dynamics of sending and receiving states and communities alike; and the politics and ethics underpinning local, national, regional and international responses to and representations of overlapping processes of (forced) migration in the contemporary world.

        Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the research network, the Roundtable was followed in December 2015, by a high profile Refuge in a Moving World Public Conversation between the renowned authors Eva Hoffman and Jonny Steinbeck chaired by IAS Director, Tamar Garb; together, they reflected on issues including migration and narration, personal and political investments in the question of refuge, African and European stories of displacement and exile, the ethical and moral imperatives that the current refugee crisis has provoked and the role of writing in recounting and relaying personal tales and testimonies.

        Between January and April 2016, the Refuge in a Moving World:  Interdisciplinary Conversations Seminar Series brought together a total of 21 UCL experts from across disciplines as wide-ranging as Global Health, Childhood Studies, Architecture, Anthropology, Politics, Early Modern History, Literature and Geography, to critically discuss the nature and implications of, and representations and responses to, conflict and displacement in and from different historical and geographical situations.

        These Seminars were accompanied by a series of Discussion Workshops, which focused on close readings of Hannah Arendt’s We Refugees, and Julia Kristeva’s Foreign Body, and a Special Event led by IAS Visiting Research Fellow, Professor Evthiomios Papataxiarchis, who discussed the unfolding of the ongoing refugee crisis, and the politics of hospitality and solidarity with refugees in Skala Sykamnias in Greece.

        Over 100 people attended the Hospitality and Hostility in a Moving World Conference in May 2016, which included 24 papers and presentations by academics, humanitarian practitioners and leading artists across four interdisciplinary panels on Journeys through Hospitality and Hostility; Negotiating Reception, Mediation and Rejection; Hospitality and Hostility in Global Spaces; and The Politics of Solidarity and Exclusion. The Conference started and ended with two dynamic Plenary Sessions, the first by Michaël Neumann of Medecins Sans Frontiers/Centre de réflexion sur l'action et les savoirs humanitaires, who offered a critical reflection on Medecins Sans Frontier’s experience of responding to the ‘migration crisis’ in Europe in 2015-2016. The Conference’s final plenary session entitled Art in a Moving World, interwove leading artist Zineb Sidera’s critical reflections on the aesthetics and politics of representing different forms of migration, mobility and conflict, with screenings of her feted artworks.

        Podcasts of selected seminars and conference papers can be listened to here. Follow us on @RefugeMvingWorld.

        Proposal

        A proposed approach for UCL.pdf — PDF document, 116 kB (119640 bytes)

        UCL Staff-Student Open Meeting in Support of Refugees

        UCL Refugee Open Meeting.pps — PowerPoint presentation, 388 kB (397312 bytes)

        Refuge in a Moving World

        The ‘Refuge in a Moving World’ network – an initiative of the UCL Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS) in collaboration with the Institute of Global Prosperity (IGP), and led by the MRU's Co-Director, Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh – brings together experts from across the UCL who work on displacement, forced migration, exile and conflict. It is grounded on the understanding that cross-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research is essential to develop a full understanding of, and a means of responding to, the human, material and representational effects of intersecting processes of mass displacement around the world.

        The network organises research-led interdisciplinary events, including seminar seriesconferences, workshops and public debates, to help us better understand the history, causes, experiences, representations and implications of ongoing shifts in politics, people and perceptions. See here for a summary of our activities in 2015-2016.

        This site offers a snapshot of some of the world-leading research taking place across UCL into these complex questions in the form of a Directory of UCL scholars who are members of Refuge in a Moving World, and of relevant research projects across UCL. As the Directory is a work in progress, if you would like to join the network or include your project, please email e.fiddian-qasmiyeh@ucl.ac.uk.


        Refuge in a Moving World Members

        Dr. Rob Aldridge is an NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer at the UCL-Institute of Health Informatics. Rob’s current research focuses on infectious disease epidemiology and the health inequalities faced by vulnerable, and often invisible populations, including migrants and refugees. Rob’s unique training in engineering, medicine and epidemiology allow him to carry out research using a range of methods including mathematical modelling of infectious disease, observational, interventional and cost effectiveness studies. He is a member of the UCL–Lancet Commission on Migration and Health. You can follow him on @rob_aldridge.
        E-mail: r.aldridge@ucl.ac.uk

        Giovanna Astolfo is Teaching Fellow at the UCL-Development Planning Unit. Her research focuses on informal urbanisms, and bordering practices in the urban context. She is currently part of a interdisciplinary DPU research project on 'Refugee Cities. The actual space of migration'. Further research interests are related to the ethics of design, especially the social role of architects and the legacy of the community architecture movement.
        E-mail: giovanna.astolfo.13@ucl.ac.uk

        Tom Bailey is Leverhulme Artist in Residence at UCL-Geography/Migration Research Unit. Tom is a theatre maker and director. Creating work through his company, The Mechanical Animal Corporation, he has developed work across the UK, and internationally in Egypt and Finland. He read English at UCL (2007). In 2016 he was making theatre with refugees in the Good Chance theatre in the Calais 'Jungle'. During his residency with the Migration Research Unit Tom will be researching and developing work that explores migration through live performance.

        Dr. Camillo Boano is Senior Lecturer at UCL-Development Planning Unit. He is an architect and urbanist with interests in humanitarian urbanism, environmental forced migration, temporary shelters, post-disaster housing reconstruction, and communication in emergencies. He leads the DPU's new project, Refugee Cities: the Actual Spaces of Migration. You can follow him @CamilloBoano
        E-mail: c.boano@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr Beverley Butler is a Reader in Cultural Heritage at UCL Institute of Archaeology. Her key interests include: Critical Heritage perspectives, ‘Heritage Wellbeing’ and the transformative ‘efficacies of heritage’ particularly in contexts of marginalisation, displacement, conflict and extremis. Beverley has on-going long-term fieldwork research in the Middle East – notably in Egypt, Palestine and Jordan.  Her long-standing research collaboration with Dr Fatima Al-Nammari (Petra University Jordan) includes: Dislocated Identities and ‘Non-places’ – Heritage, Place-making and Wellbeing in Refugee Camps (2011- ongoing). Beverley is Co-Investigator on a new joint ESRC/AHRC Global Challenges Research Fund research project with Professor Helen Chatterjee in collaboration with the Helen Bamber Centre which looks at the role of creative arts and cultural activities in improving health and wellbeing.
        E-mail: beverley.butler@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Estella Carpi is Research Associate at UCL-Development Planning Unit and Humanitarian Affairs Advisor at Save the Children UK. She is a social anthropologist who is coordinating a new project, Human, Economic, and Social Flows Beyond Crisis at UCL. Her research interests lie primarily in humanitarianism, refugee migration, welfare, and politics of aid. You can follow her on www.mabisir.wordpress.com and @estycrp.
        E-mail: e.carpi@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Elaine Chase is Senior Lecturer in Education, Health Promotion and International Development in the Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL-Institute of Education. Her research interests include the intersection between migration and wellbeing outcomes. Her current research investigates the outcomes for independent migrant and refugee children as they make the transition to ‘adulthood’.
        E-mail:
        e.chase@ucl.ac.uk

        Prof. Helen Chatterjee is a Professor of Biology in UCL Biosciences and Head of Research and Teaching in UCL Culture. Her museological research investigates the value of cultural participation to health, wellbeing and education. She is PI on a number of projects including an ESRC/AHRC GCRF project entitled Co-developing a method for assessing the psychosocial impact of cultural interventions with displaced people: towards an integrated care framework, in collaboration with Dr Bev Butler, UCL Archaeology, Dr Fatima Al-Nammari at the University of Petra, the Helen Bamber Foundation and Talbieh Refugee Camp. You can follow her on @h_chatterjee.

         

        Dr. Sarah Crafter is Senior Research Officer in the Thomas Coram Research Institute at UCL-IOE. Sarah’s academic interests lie in the area of migration, diversity and the development of identities. By background she is a cultural-developmental psychologist whose work is grounded in sociocultural theory, transitions, critical or contested ideas of ‘normative’ development and cultural identity development. She has a longstanding interest in working with child language who are children and young people who translate and interpreter for family members after migration to a new country. Recently she has been working on research ('New families') that seeks to explore the care of children, by other children when they are unaccompanied refugee minors. This work involves exploring how they navigate care and asylum systems.
        E-mail: s.crafter@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Delan Devakumar is a Clinical Lecturer in the UCL Institute for Global Health. He is a medical doctor with experience in clinical paediatrics and public health. His research is on maternal and child health and is part of the Lancet Commission on Migration and Health.
        E-mail: d.devakumar@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh is Director of the Refuge in a Moving World network and is Co-Director of the Migration Research Unit at the Department of Geography. Elena specialises in forced migration and conflict-induced displacement, with a particular thematic interest in gender, generation and religion, and a regional focus on the Middle East and North Africa. She is currently the PI of two major projects: Local Community Experiences of Displacement from Syria (funded by the AHRC-ESRC) and Analysing South-South Humanitarian Responses to Displacement from Syria: Views from Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey (funded by the European Research Council). You can follow her on @RefugeeHosts and @RefugeMvingWrld.
        E-mail: e.fiddian-qasmiyeh@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Adele Galipo is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the UCL-Institute of Education whose research interests include transnationalism, diasporas and migrants return; urban diversity; development and humanitarian interventions; and nation-building processes. Her regional focus is the Horn of Africa, particularly the Somali region.
        E-mail: a.galipo@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr François Guesnet is Reader in Modern Jewish History in the UCL-Department of Hebrew and Jewish History. Migration has been a prominent feature in Jewish history from its inception, and forced migrations are part of this history of migrations. François works specifically on responses of Jewish communities to react - politically and socially - to such challenging situations in the early modern and modern period (16-19th centuries). You can follow him on @fguesnet.
        E-mail: f.guesnet@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr Philippa Hetherington is Lecturer in Modern Eurasian History at UCL- SSEES. She researches gender, migration and law in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Philippa is currently completing a book on the emergence of 'trafficking in women' as a social problem and legal category at the fin-de-siècle, with a focus on the region considered the primary source country of trafficked women in this period, the Russian empire. She is also the Co-Investigator (with Dr. Julia Laite, Birkbeck) on the three-year AHRC project 'Trafficking, Smuggling and Illicit Migration in Gendered and Historical Perspective.' You can follow her on @philippahether
        E-mail: p.hetherington@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Katherine Ibbett is Reader in Early Modern Studies in UCL-French/SELCS. She works on early modern France, and especially on the affective undertow of religious difference, including the Huguenot diaspora; Katherine is also interested in the cultural contributions (translations, teaching, writing) of Huguenot refugees in London in the seventeenth and eighteenth century and in the way refugees are figured in texts of this period. You can follow her on @eparpillee
        E-mail:
        k.ibbett@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr Cassidy Johnson is a Senior Lecturer at UCL-Development Planning Unit. She is an urbanist who is interested in migration and displacement in relation to urbanisation and urban life. Her core research focus is on disasters and post-disaster recovery, and this extends into looking at how people living through crisis situations make their way in the city, and how existing governance mechanisms can support them. Her current projects include: Human, Economic, and Social Flows Beyond Crisis: Understanding the “Urbanitarian” (HESF), which is a DPU collaboration with Save the Children, UK; Reducing Relocation Risks and Urban Africa Risk Knowledge. You can follow her on @cassidyajohnson.

        Prof. Ben Kaplan is Professor of Dutch History in the Department of History. He specialises in the history of relations between religious groups in early modern Europe – in essence, the history of religious toleration and conflict in Europe in the 16th-18th centuries. The history of early modern religious refugees is one important aspect of this topic.
        E-mail: b.kaplan@ucl.ac.uk

        Ricardo Martén is a PhD Candidate and Researcher at the UCL-Development Planning Unit. His interests lie in the urban dynamics between informality, violence and migratory trends, as well as the role of urban design as a theoretical complement to the production of space. Current research projects look to examine these elements, particularly focusing on the urban legacy of official spaces of exception and the resulting informal counter-narratives.

        Dr. Richard Mole is Senior Lecturer in Political Sociology at UCL-SSEES. Richard's research examines the experiences of LGBTQ asylum-seekers/refugees from Russia and other post-Soviet states. It examines the politicisation of non-normative sexual and gender identities in the former USSR, the different forms of persecution by the state and society in the post-Soviet space as well as the narratives LGBTQ asylum-seekers need to produce to make their claims understandable in the West.

        E-mail: r.mole@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr Marta Niccolai is Teaching Fellow at the Department of Italian. Her research focuses on theatre events performed in war territories, primarily the Middle East, and in Europe, that explore human rights and refugees’ rights. She analyses the methodology applied and how the actor’s body and voice is used to encourage a deeper understanding between geographically and culturally different people who are brought closer by forced migration.
        E-mail: marta.niccolai@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr Miriam Orcutt is a medical doctor and academic researcher currently coordinating the UCL-Lancet Commission for Migration and Health; she is a Research Associate at UCL’s Institute of Global Health. Her background is in medical anthropology and her current research explores refugee health, including through research with Syrian refugees in informal camps in Northern Greece. You can follow her on @miriamorcutt. 
        Email: m.orcutt@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Tejendra Pherali is Senior Lecturer in Education and International Development at UCL-Institute of Education. His research focuses on education in conflict-affected societies and the role of education in post-conflict peace building. He is currently involved in research into educational challenges for Syrian refugee children in Lebanon and Jordan, and education for peace in Somaliland. You can follow him on @pherali.

        Dr. Thibaut Raboin is Teaching Fellow at the Department of French. He is the author of Discourses on LGBT asylum in the UK: constructing a queer haven, published by Manchester University Press (2016), and has authored articles on LGBT asylum and homonationalism. His interdisciplinary research is based on the critical discourse analysis of French and UK public discourses, in particular in relation to race, sexuality, gender and migration, and the emergence and configuration of social problems in public arenas. Alongside his work on the discourses of forced migration, his current research concerns the expression of social suffering on the radio, with an attention to listening as both a mode of governmentality and a critical act.
        E-mail:
        thibaut.raboin.09@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Rachel Rosen is Lecturer in Childhood in the Department of Social Science at UCL-Institute of Education. She is currently examining the care of children, by children, on migration journeys, as well as how these caring practices are taken into account (or not) in children's efforts to settle and claim asylum in the UK. With her colleague Dr Sarah Crafter, Rachel received seed funding from the UCL Global Engagement Fund to develop this new research area.
        E-mail:
        r.rosen@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr. Tatiana Thieme is Lecturer in Human Geography at UCL-Department of Geography. Her research interests engage with different aspects of austerity and makeshift urbanism, focusing on alternative cultural and economic geographies related to the politics of urban poverty, informal work, and everyday strategies in contexts of precarious urban environments. Building on her recent ethnographic work in Nairobi’s informal settlements and on-going work in London with offenders nearing the end of their prison sentence, Tatiana’s new British Academy-funded project - Temporary migrants or new European citizens? Geographies of integration and response between ‘camps’ and the city - brings together her research interests in informality, labour limbo, and social navigation of uncertain urban life. More information about her new project is included below.
        E-mail: t.thieme@ucl.ac.uk

        Dr Ralph Wilde (UCL-Laws) is an expert in public international law, and also has an interest in the interface between international law and related academic disciplines, including international relations and legal and political theory.  His appointments include being Senior Research Associate at the Refugee Law Initiative of the Human Rights Consortium of the University of London School of Advanced Studies.  He is a long-standing member of the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM), having served as Rapporteur for one of the IASFM’s conferences. His research on migration has included work on UNHCR administration of camps housing refugees and IDPs, and the extraterritorial application of human rights and refugee law in the migration context, from sea-rescues to the extraterritorial posting of border officials.  His ongoing work on extraterritoriality is as PI of the project ‘human rights beyond borders’, funded by an ERC Starting Grant. More information, including publications, on Ralph is available [here] and on the human rights beyond borders project [see below and here]. You can follow him on @ralphwilde.
        E-mail:
        ralph.wilde@ucl.ac.uk

        Directory of Refugee-related Research Projects Across UCL

        Analysing South-South Humanitarian Responses to Displacement from Syria (2017-2022)

        • Through fieldwork in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey, this ERC-funded project examines how, why and with what effect Southern actors - states, civil society networks, and refugees themselves - have responded to displacement from Syria. The project purposefully centralise refugees’ own experiences of and perspectives on these Southern-led initiatives. Indeed, by bringing refugees’ voices to the forefront, the project aims to shed a unique light on refugees’ understandings of humanitarianism, and the extent to which they consider that diverse Southern-led responses to conflict-induced displacement can or should be conceptualised as ‘humanitarian’ programmes. In so doing, the project makes a particularly significant contribution to debates regarding the desirability and/or tensions of ‘alternative’ forms of humanitarianism which have, until now, been monopolised by Northern academic and policy perspectives.
        • The project is led by Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (UCL-Geography, MRU)
        • Affiliation: UCL-Department of Geography.

        BUDDcamp & Buddlab
        • The aim of the BUDDcamp is to investigate the multiple housing pathway of migrants. Through the use of different methodological instruments, this research tries to gather the complexity concerning the dimension of home in migrants’ experience. The fieldwork, neighborhoods in Brescia, Italy, are chosen for two main reasons: in the one hand they are characterized by a considerable presence of migrants at different stages of their migration experience, on the other hand they are interested by urban renovation programs and social interventions promoted by private and public actors. Individual experiences are thus investigated, alongside with spatial phenomena, policies and interventions. Achieving these different fields of interest implied the utilization of life story interviews, ethnographic observation, key informants interviews and participatory maps. This last technique constitutes a methodological innovation. In addition the research aims to reflect on the efficacy and limits of housing and immigration policies drawing on evidence based data.
        • This is an annual design exercise which is part of the MSc Building and Urban Design in Development
        • Affiliation: UCL-Development Planning Unit

         

        Co-Developing a method for assessing the psychosocial impact of cultural interventions with displaced people: Towards an integrated care framework

        • Stories of displaced people, migration and immigration continue to occupy headline news. Huge efforts are being made by displaced people and associated relief agencies to help deal with the many challenges of displacement and migration and many of these efforts involve the use of arts, heritage and cultural activities. The impact of these programmes on participants' health and wellbeing has often been overlooked in relation to their overall health and how such cultural programmes contribute to recovery, adjustment and other challenges associated with displacement, such as employability. This project - funded by the ESRC-AHRC under the GCRF - aims to better understand the role of creative arts and cultural activities in improving health and wellbeing. The project will also explore the potential for the arts to play a central role in improving issues associated with resettlement, employability and learning new skills, and consider how this could feed into relevant policies such as those related to immigration.
        • The project team is led by Prof. Helen Chatterjee (Department of Genetics, Environment and Evolution, UCL), with co-investigators Dr. Fatima Al-Nammari (Department of Architecture, University of Petra), Dr. Beverley Butler (Institute of Archaeology, UCL) and Dr. Linda Thomson (UCL Culture).
        • Affiliation: Department of Genetics, Environment and Evolution, UCL; Institute of Archeology, UCL; UCL-Culture; Univeristy of Petra; in collaboration with the Helen Bamber Foundation in London and the Women’s Programme Centre at Talbieh Refugee Camp in Jordan.

         

        Dislocated Identities and ‘Non-places’ – Heritage, Place-making and Wellbeing in Refugee Camps (2011- ongoing):

        • This project examines the use of heritage as a resource by which to engage with dislocated identities and strategies of transformation/ empowerment. This project is based on ground-breaking ethnographic research undertaken in five Palestinian refugee camps in Jordan and Zaatari Syrian refugee camp also in Jordan. Key outcomes include a collection of oral histories and the creation of Community Archives in these locations.
        • The project team is led by Dr. Beverley Butler (Institute of Archaeology, UCL) with co-investigator Dr. Fatima Al-Nammari (Department of Architecture, University of Petra, Jordan)
        • Affiliation: Institute of Archeology, UCL; Univeristy of Petra.

         

        Human, Economic, and Social Flows Beyond Crisis: Understanding the “Urbanitarian” (HESF)

        • As protraction of crises increasingly becomes a long term drive for urban change and a challenge for city governance and infrastructures, this research project focuses on “urban-itarian” settings: that is the interactional moment between the urban and the humanitarian, when cities have become home to humanitarian actors and de facto refugees, and urban and humanitarian infrastructures provide and negotiate basic services and livelihoods. The project investigates how human, social, and economic relations, exchange and consumption experiences can better inform humanitarian policies and practices, both of which regulate access and relations to services, labour, and resources.
        • The project team is composed by Dr. Estella Carpi (jointly based at DPU and HAT), Dr. Andrea Rigon (DPU), Dr. Camillo Boano (DPU), and Dr. Cassidy Johnson (DPU), and Fernando Espada (HAT), Sophie Dicker (HAT), Dr. Jessica Field (HAT).
        • Affiliation: This project has been developed by The Bartlett’s Development Planning Unit,  University College London (DPU) and the Humanitarian Affairs Team of Save the Children UK (HAT).

         

        Human Rights Beyond Borders

        • States have an impact on human rights not only in their own territories.  Also, often there is an extraterritorial impact—on people in the rest of the world.  From drone strikes to economic sanctions, states affect human rights beyond their borders.  For civil and political rights, relevant extraterritorial activity includes war, occupation, anti-migration and anti-piracy initiatives at sea, sanctions, extraordinary rendition, and the operation of extraterritorial detention and interrogation sites housing combatants and migrants, including refugees. This ERC-funded interdisciplinary project aims to provide a critical evaluation of the law and policy of whether and to what extent international human rights law is and should be applicable extraterritorially.  It covers both civil and political rights and economic, social and cultural rights, including the right to development.
        • This project team is led by Dr. Ralph Wilde (UCL-Laws), with Dr. Karen Da Costa (UCL-Laws)
        • Affiliation: UCL-Faculty of Laws
        • Website: https://www.laws.ucl.ac.uk/research/centres-institutes/human-rights-beyond-borders/

         

        Local Community Experiences Of Displacement From Syria: Views from Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey (Refugee Hosts: 2016-2020)

        • This AHRC-ESRC funded project aims to improve our understanding of the challenges and opportunities that arise in local responses to displacement, both for refugees from Syria and for the members of the communities that are hosting them in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. Through interdisciplinary and participatory research in and with 9 local communities in the Middle East, this project fills a major evidence gap about the roles played by local communities – including those that explicitly or implicitly identify with and are motivated by faith – in supporting, and/or undermining, people affected by conflict and displacement: refugees and hosts alike.
        • The project is led by Dr. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (UCL-Geography) in collaboration with Prof. Alastair Ager (Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh and Columbia University), Dr. Anna Rowlands (Durham University) and Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge (University of East Anglia).
        • Affiliation: UCL-Geography; Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh; Durham University; University of East Anglia; in partnership with PEN International; the Joint Learning Initiative on Local Faith Communities, Refugees and Forced Migration Hub; and in collaboration with Stories in Transit and the Humanitarian Affairs Team of Save the Children UK (HAT).
        • Webpage and Twitter: www.refugeehosts.org and @RefugeeHosts

          • This research project consists of a multi-scale analysis of the spatial, social and economic impacts of migration in the urban context, trying to merge transdisciplinary approaches including data-driven mapping and ethnographical research. This will help to create an original composite of spatial visualizations through different media channels, shared and disseminated through an interactive, digital platform. By identifying the overlooked issues surrounding the refugee crisis in European cities and challenging the dominant narratives, the platform will provide a reliable overlap of data, curated to better interpret and cope with the intensifying impact of migration on cities.
          • The project's working team is led by Dr. Camillo Boano (DPU) and is composed by Dr. Kayvan Karimi (Space Syntax Laboratory), Dr. Ed Manley (CASA), Dr Falli Palaiologou (Space Syntax Laboratory), Dr. Giovanna Astolfo (DPU) and Ricardo Marten (DPU).
          • Affiliation: UC-Development Planning Unit; Space Syntax Laboratory; CASA
          • Twitter: @BrmgRefugee

           

          Refugee Health: Syrian narratives of flight and health encounters

          • This project has involved research in informal refugee camps in Northern Greece in 2015-2016, where Syrian refugees’ narratives of flight and health encounters were gathered through focus groups and interviews. Individual narratives of flight from within Syria, across the Turkish border, by boat across the Mediterranean to Greece and subsequently to the border of Greece/Macedonia were often similar; however the lived experiences and trauma exposure varied widely, as did cultural perceptions of trauma and individual resilience. By collecting these narratives, the project has aimed to gain insight into the physical and psychological health needs within this transient, vulnerable population, as well as a deeper appreciation of the impact of culture, health and illness perceptions on dealing with both acute and chronic trauma. During the research period, the findings were used immediately to improve the NGO health response through integration into health needs assessments, demonstrating the importance of individual health narratives in improving humanitarian health response and health provision.
          • This project is led by Dr. Miriam Orcutt (UCL-IGH)
          • Affiliation: UCL-Institute of Global Health

           

          Temporary migrants or new European citizens? Geographies of integration and response between ‘camps’ and the city.

          • Funded by the British Academy UK International Challenges award, this project aims to provide an alternative account of the European ‘refugee crisis’, where the arrival of over 1.5 million refugees since 2015 has stretched EU and individual state capacities; tested formal registration and arrival procedures; and (reignited) debates around continental ‘margins’ and geopolitical power differentials between east and west Europe. In this project, we provincialise and challenge narratives of ‘the crisis’ through an engagement with the evolving duties of care, needs and agencies of refugees and providers on the arrival ‘frontlines’. Our multi-sited research engages with the myriad forms of arrival settlement, from the makeshift and temporary camps along the Hungarian-Serbian border to the sprawling tent communities in Lesbos, and the disintegration of the ‘Jungle’ in Calais. By ‘thinking from the south’ and vantage of post-colonial cities, we will capture and explore the improvisation, precarity, makeshift practices and alternative scripts of citizenship that refugees and local agencies utilize alongside how state rules and norms are negotiated.
          • The project is led by Dr Tatiana Thieme (UCL-Geography) in collaboration with Dr. Eszter Kovacs (University of Cambridge) and Dr. Kavita Ramakrishnan (UEA).
          • Affiliation: UCL-Department of Geography

           

          The work of Teatro di Nascosto/Hidden Theatre

          • This interdisciplinary research examines the work ethics adopted by Teatro di Nascosto/Hidden Theatre, an International Theatre company based in Italy that creates events in territories of war and occupied territories primarily in the Middle East, and in European cities. The project analyses how Annet Henneman, the Company's director and founder, applies theatre reportage and theatre anthropology to explore human rights and refugees' rights with the intent to create a deeper understanding between the people living in the Middle East and those living in Europe. The project explores the notion of 'hospitality' in relation to Henneman's travelling to meet the people whose stories are told in the theatrical events, and in relation to the actor's training for international acting groups. Ultimately, the research examines the effect of these intersected methodologies through the actor's body and voice in the act of performance.
          • The project is led by Dr. Marta Niccolai
          • Affiliation: UCL-Department of Italian

           

           

          Trafficking, Smuggling and Illicit Migration in Gendered and Historical Perspective.
          • Human trafficking, 'people smuggling' and clandestine migration are some of the most politically volatile and socially pressing issues in the present day, but they also have a long history. This project contributes significantly to the emerging study of the history of illicit and clandestine migration by examining the history of trafficking in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in comparative and global perspective. The PI, Julia Laite, a specialist on trafficking and migration in the British World, and the CoI, Philippa Hetherington, a specialist on trafficking in the Russian empire, will collaborate to produce a comparative study of trafficking and clandestine migration in these two nations and empires in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, while organizing a series of workshops and a major digital collaboration project that will bring together historians who are studying trafficking, smuggling and illicit migration in other areas of the world in the modern period. This digital collaboration will also produce a web-application, centred around an interactive mapping project, which will be collaboratively built by project participants based on their own research and expertise and shared widely with both academic and non-academic stakeholders.
          • This project is led by Dr. Julia Laite (Birkbeck) with Dr. Philippa Hetherington (UCL-SSEES).
          • Affiliation: UCL-School of Slavonic and East European Studies

           

          Zugunruhe

          • 'Zugunruhe' is a theatre project that explores migration patterns in both humans and the natural world, and examines the cultural/ political construction of a 'refugee'. The project builds on Tom Bailey's earlier his work with refugees at the Good Chance theatre in the Calais 'Jungle' refugee camp in 2016. During Tom's residency with the Migration Research Unit as Leverhulme Artist in Residence, he will be researching and developing work that explores migration through live performance. Throughout his residence, Tom will be running a series of workshops around his research, and presenting a developmental performance of 'Zugunruhe' later in 2017.
          • The project is led by Tom Bailey, Leverhulme Artist in Residence at the UCL-Migration Research Unit
          • Affiliation: Migration Research Unit, UCL-Geography.
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