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UCL Home  /  Geography  /  People  /  Research Students  /  Stephen Long

Stephen Long

London NERC DTP funded PhD student

Sustainable fishing in Greenland: impact of deep-sea trawling on benthic ecosystems

Contact

DSCF0913.JPGphone: +44 (0) 20 7449 6369

skype: steve_d_long

twitter: @Stephen_D_Long

web:  Zoological Society of London profile and London NERC DTP profile

Address: Nuffield Building, Institute of Zoology, Outer Circle, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY

 

 

 

 

 

Research

Stephen’s interests lie in ensuring the sustainable management and exploitation of natural resources, particularly in marine environments. His research has addressed fishery management in the UK, Madagascar and now Greenland.

PhD project - Sustainable fishing in Greenland: impact of deep-sea trawling on benthic ecosystems

The entrance of Greenland’s fisheries to the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification scheme has highlighted the paucity of knowledge on the impacts of bottom-trawling on deep-sea benthic ecosystems in the Arctic. This collaborative project will develop understanding of benthic communities and the impacts of trawling in the Greenland halibut fishery, using photographic, video, bycatch and environmental data. Further the project will allow a critical evaluation of the role of the MSC certification scheme in fishery governance, with wider applications to the management of deep-sea fisheries and those engaged in the MSC certification scheme.

This contributes a wider collaborative project exploring benthic ecosystems and fishing impacts in west Greenland.

Other projects

Project Oratsimba was an FAO-Smartfish funded project to establish community-based lobster fishery management, including the introduction of periodic No Take Zones, in Sainte Luce, southeast Madagascar. The fishers of Sainte Luce are active contributors to MIHARI – Madagascar’s locally managed marine area (LMMA) network.  Findings from participatory fisheries monitoring have been used to inform local management with applications to small-scale fisheries across the Western Indian Ocean.

The Marine Protected Area Governance (MPAG) framework was developed to offer a empirical tool for critically analysing the governance of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Building on previous work in Madagascar, recent research has seen the novel application of this framework to a community managed small-scale crab fishery and LMMA in northwest Madagascar.

The Fal oyster fishery, Cornwall, has been in operation since Roman times and is the last remaining commercial sailing fleet in Europe.  Fishers continue to employ traditional methods, deploying hand-hauled dredges and from sailing boats and rowing punts.  This offers a stark counterfactual to the increasing power and mechanisation of commercial fisheries in the last 100 years. Working with collaborators at the University of Exeter, data from GPS loggers on boats and fisheries monitoring data was combined to gain insights into this unique fishery.

Ongoing involvement in a long-term terrestrial ecological monitoring project in the dry-forest and mangroves of the Mahamavo watershed, northwest Madagascar.  The project combines multi-taxa survey data with remote sensing to understand long-term trends and inform conservation. This is achieved through collaboration between the University of Oxford, Operation Wallacea, Development and Biodiversity Conservation Action Madagascar (DBCAM) and the community of Mariarano.

Supervision and funding

Funding is provided as part of the London NERC Doctoral Training Programme (DTP).  The project is supervised by: Dr Chris Yesson, Institute of Zoology; Dr Kirsty Kemp, Institute of Zoology; Dr Peter Jones, University College London; and Dr Martin Blicher, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources.

Publications

Papers

Long, S., Jones, P.J.S., Zoavina, R. and Hadj-Hammou, J. (In Press) Governance analysis of a community managed small-scale crab fishery in Madagascar: novel use of an empirical framework. Marine Policy

Long, S. (2017) Short-term impacts and value of a periodic no take zone (NTZ) in a community-managed small-scale lobster fishery, Madagascar. PLOS ONE https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0177858

Long, S., Ffrench-Constant. R, Metcalfe, K. and Witt, M.J. (2017) Have centuries of inefficient fishing sustained a wild oyster fishery: a case study. Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal 8 https://doi.org/10.4172/2150-3508.1000198

Reports

Skinner, F., Burtenshaw-deVries, A., Long, S., Randrianantenaina, S. and Ellis, E. (2016) Phase two project for community lobster fishery management in the village of Sainte Luce (Project Oratsimba): Final report. FAO-SmartFish Programme of the Indian Ocean Commission, Ebene, Mauritius.

Biography

Education

PhD Student, London NERC DTP PhD Studentship, Institute of Zoology and University College London

MSc Conservation and Biodiversity, University of Exeter, 2013 – 2014

BSc (Hons) 2:1 Biology, Univeristy of Durham, 2009 - 2012

Awards and Scholarships

Daisy Balogh Fund, research grant, 2017

J Willson Charitable Trust, travel and research grant, 2015.

Leverhulme Trade Charities Trust, bursary for MSc, 2013

Deloitte Scholar Scheme, annual bursary throughout BSc, 2009 - 2012

Selected employment

Marine Research Co-ordinator, SEED Madagascar, 2015 - 2016

Database Manager and Lecturer, Operation Wallacea, 2014 - present

Field Ecologist, Thompson Ecology Ltd, 2013

Research Intern, Durham University’s Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience (IHRR), 2012