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UCL Home  /  Geography  /  People  /  Research Students  /  Cecil Sagoe

Cecil Sagoe

Contact

For more information about my research or about publication opportunities:

Email: cecil.sagoe.13@ucl.ac.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CecilSagoe

Current Research

Working Title: Planning, Politics and Power - Governing Housing and Regeneration in London's Olympic area

My thesis examines how the English planning system politically functions to govern housing and regeneration planning in London’s Olympic area. Through this case study, I make contributions to critical planning literature conceptualising the dimensions of governance and politics permeating planning practice in England. Over the last several years this is a field of study which has been powerfully influenced by the post-politics discourse. This discourse chiefly argues that planning is suffering from a post-political condition; a condition which is believed to be characterised by a neoliberal consensus that has residualised the presence of politics within planning. An important corollary is that planning generates acquiesce for neoliberal urban agendas. I use the case of housing and regeneration planning in London’s Olympic area to engage with, and critique, these perspectives.

I adopt a plural conceptual approach that draws insights from Foucauldian literature, critical approaches to multi-level governance, the regulatory capitalism discourse, elements of the post-politics discourse, Chantal Mouffe and Robert Unger. My methodology comprises of: (1) ethnographic research on the LLDC's Local Plan production process; and (2) ethnographic research on several case study sites-Greater Carpenters, Chobham Manor, Hackney Wick, and East Wick; and (3) ethnographic and action research on three community groups that are attempting shape housing and regeneration planning in London's Olympic area, and London more widely-the Greater Carpenters Neighbourhood Forum, the Hackney Wick and Fish Island Cultural Interest Group, and Just Space.

Based on this research, I highlight three key findings. Firstly, that housing and regeneration planning in London’s Olympic area is being shaped by a planning system that operates as a neoliberal governmentality which encompasses the mobilisation of discriminatory rationales. Secondly, that politics is an animating rather than residual feature of this planning framework. Thirdly, that the Greater Carpenters Neighbourhood Forum, the Hackney Wick and Fish Island Cultural Interest Group, and Just Space's engagements with state planning are not leading them to simply acquiesce to neoliberal planning agendas for London's Olympic area, and London more widely. Rather, through deploying multi-faceted strategies, they are providing politically productive challenges to neoliberal planning for these two areas.

    Education

    • University College London, Department of Geography, MPhil/PhD (2013 – 2017)

    Working Title: Planning, Politics and Power - Governing Housing and Regeneration in London's Olympic area

    The University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management, MSc Poverty and Development (2011 – 2012)

    Thesis: Arts and Culture in Development: AfroReggae’s use of Music Initiatives to Reduce Youth Gang Violence in Rio de Janeiro

    • The University of Manchester, School of Social Sciences, BA Hons (Econ) Development Studies and Economics (2007 – 2010)

    Thesis: The State-Market Relationship and the Political Economy of Development: The Case of Oil in Ghana

    Publications

    Sagoe, C. (2016) 'One Tool Amongst Many: Considering the Political Potential of Neighbourhood Planning for the Greater Carpenters Neighbourhood, London', Architecture, Media, Politics, Society, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 1 - 20.

    Sagoe, C. (2016) 'A review of "Olympic housing: A critical review of London 2012's legacy", By Penny Bernstock', International Journal of Housing Policy, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 556 - 558.

    ‘Squeezing the Poor out of London’, openDemocracy, 2013