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UCL Home  /  Geography  /  News & Events  /  News  /  September 2017  /  Restoring ponds in the ‘Great Twin Pond Dig”

Restoring ponds in the ‘Great Twin Pond Dig”

Successful summer for UCL Geography Pond Restoration Group

Restoring ponds in the ‘Great Twin Pond Dig”

Helen Greaves and Dr Carl Sayer of UCL Geography’s Pond Restoration Research Group (PRRG) have been working hard on their British Ecological Society funded “Great Twin Pond Dig” project this summer.

This Citizen Science project aims to get local people involved with farmland pond restoration and science. The project is trialling an “Adopt-a-Pond” approach and a team of locals from Norfolk and Lancashire (where Carl and Helen come from respectively) have been set the task of monitoring three overgrown farmland ponds before and after restoration by scrub and mud removal.

The teams started work in February 2017 and have been out measuring pond chemistry and biology using all sorts of techniques, even including camera trapping of visiting mammals and birds. They have had a brilliant time!

In June, experts on all sorts of species groups descended on the ponds to pass on natural history knowledge to the volunteers. Carl and Helen also ran a number of field-based pond restoration workshops for UK conservation organisations, also attended by the volunteers.

In September Helen and Carl led a number of farmland pond restorations in North Norfolk, with much fantastic help from UCL Geography MSc Aquatic Science students.

Two of the ponds were restored for the Great Twin Pond Dig project and the Norfolk Citizen Scientists are very excited to see what happens to the ponds as they re-colonise. The Lancashire ponds are also soon to be restored.

To follow progress with this project do search Twitter using #pondtwins and #adoptapond and follow the exploits of the PRRG too @uclponds


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The PRRG takes a break


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