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UCL Home  /  Geography  /  News & Events  /  News  /  Salome on life after graduating

Salome on life after graduating

Evolving from UCL Geography to marine science in the Galápagos

Salome on life after graduating

Salome Buglass graduated from UCL Geography with a BSc degree in 2009. In a new blog on the UCL Geography web site she gives an entertaining account of how gaining a wide range of experience, and persistence, has culminating in her working as a marine ecologist at the Charles Darwin Foundation in the Galápagos Islands.

After graduating, Salome earned her living for three years in Trinidad and Tobago, while also training as a diver and volunteer coral reef surveyor. This experience helped her in applying to study for a two-year Master Research degree at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. During this she investigated the impacts of climate change on tropical marine ecosystems, carrying out her own field study of coral reef bleaching in Tobago. After the results were published, she was eventually “gobsmacked” to be offered her ‘fantasy job’ in the Galápagos!

The Galapagos Marine Reserve faces major challenges relating to its governance, the growth of visitors, pressures from legal and illegal fishing, El Nino events and the effects of climate change (see UCL Geography’s Peter Jones’s paper for more information).

Salome reflects on how her multidisciplinary geographical background has actually been a great fit for the work:

Only the multi-disciplinary subject of geography enabled me to mix and match courses such as ecology, palaeoclimatology, hydroclimatology and coastal systems, with courses on people and cities, development and poverty, natural resource management conservation and livelihoods.”

Now, when I find myself bouncing from fisheries management planning meetings, to doing logistically challenging field work to assess marine habitats, to writing papers on spatial and temporal distribution of species, or providing my two cents to the ecosystem services valuation team, I have really come to appreciate having studied geography, as it could not have served me better.”

See:

  • For more details about her current work, visit Salome’s website.
  • Read Salome’s blog post on the department blog.
  • Peter Jones’s (2013)  paper.

Image

Salome, from her blog


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