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UCL Home  /  Geography  /  News & Events  /  News  /  News Archive  /  May 2010  /  Pablo Mateos visits New Zealand and Japan

Pablo Mateos visits New Zealand and Japan

Expanding the spatial analysis of personal names

Pablo Mateos visits New Zealand and Japan

In late February, Dr Pablo Mateos visited the School of Environment at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, for two weeks to work on a research project with Professor David O'Sullivan entitled Identity clustering in naming networks.

The visit was undertaken to expand a research collaboration begun in 2008, during Professor O’Sullivan’s sabbatical at CASA and with the Splint Project at UCL. This applies advanced network clustering techniques to the spatial analysis of populations, especially in studying ethnic segregation in cities through patterns of personal names.

In New Zealand, Pablo and David made significant progress in expanding previous UCL work, based on population registers drawn from European countries, to other multi-ethnic countries with rich and complex population histories. These include New Zealand (NZ), with its diversity of names drawn from around the world, especially the Pacific region (e.g. Maori, Tongan, Fijian, and Samoan names).

Together they analysed New Zealand's Electoral Register, as well as population registers from the 26 countries examined by the UCL WorldNames project, using complex network clustering techniques. The results will appear in a future scientific paper. The project is partly funded by an International Travel Grant from the Royal Society and the Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF) of the University of Auckland.

On the return trip Pablo stopped for a few days at the University of Tokyo, Japan, to visit Professor Yasushi Asami, the Director of the Centre for Spatial Information Science (CSIS), where he gave a seminar on the analysis of residential segregation through people's names.

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