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UCL Home  /  Geography  /  News & Events  /  News  /  News Archive  /  May 2008  /  UCL Geography researchers receive funding from the National Centre for Earth Observation

UCL Geography researchers receive funding from the National Centre for Earth Observation

Dr Philip Lewis, Dr Mat Disney and Dr Tristan Quaife will receive NERC funding from the National Centre for Earth Observation Carbon Theme to develop the use of earth observation data.

UCL Geography researchers receive funding from the National Centre for Earth Observation

The kick-off meeting of the new NERC-funded National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO) Carbon Theme was hosted on Thursday May 1st at UCL.

The NCEO will provide the focus for the exploitation of earth observation in environmental sciences, building on the Earth Observation Centres of Excellence Programme. It brings together researchers from a range of disciplines across the UK who use Earth observation data from satellites and aircraft in their research. The NCEO is organised under various cross-cutting themes such as carbon, the cryosphere, climate, extreme events, among others. The funding for the NCEO from NERC is around £40m for the first 5-6 year phase.

UCL Geography is involved through principal investigators Dr Philip Lewis and Dr Mat Disney and post-doctoral researcher Dr Tristan Quaife, and will receive funding of around £500k over 5 years under the NCEO Carbon Theme. Their role is to develop the use of Earth observation data to estimate carbon fluxes from the land surface, to help monitor and measure the impact of fires on the global carbon cycle and to explore and understand links between climate and the carbon cycle. They will build on work carried out within the NERC Centre for Terrestrial Carbon Dynamics.

Attendees came from all over the UK including the far north of Scotland and from the south coast oceanographic centres to discuss collaboration across the terrestrial, atmospheric and ocean carbon communities


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