Menu

UCL Department of Geography

Home

Description Photo Here

Personal tools
Log in
This is SunRain Plone Theme
UCL Home  /  Geography  /  News & Events  /  News  /  News Archive  /  June 2015  /  Did early humans become more feminine to dominate the planet?

Did early humans become more feminine to dominate the planet?

Mark Maslin speculates in The Conversation

Did early humans become more feminine to dominate the planet?

In an article published on June 18th in The Conversation, Professor Mark Maslin suggests that 50,000 years ago early humans became more feminine.

Self-domestication allowed humans to become less reactively violent and more socially tolerant.  He speculates that male proactive violence –   thought out, discussed and planned violence – could have been used to curb, control and cull reactively violent individuals.

This process, combined with female mating choices over thousands of years, could have selected for males with lower testosterone and more feminine features, leading to a much more gender-equal society and the start of human cumulative culture.

See:

https://theconversation.com/early-humans-had-to-become-more-feminine-before-they-could-dominate-the-planet-42952


Image

Mark with early skulls


Related content
Mark Maslin
Navigation
Tweets from @UCLgeography
@UCLgeography