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Remote learning about remote sensing
  
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Remote learning about remote sensing

Mat Disney contributes to US programme for Chicago high school students

Remote learning about remote sensing

Dr. Mat Disney was recently invited to teach remote sensing to high-school students from under-served communities in Chicago, as part of their Upward Bound Maths & Science program.

The program is aimed at students of all abilities with an interest in science, and provides an introduction to applications of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) outside their regular curriculum.

Mat was invited by one of the course co-ordinators, former UCL Geography staff member Ian Usher, in his role as e-learning co-ordinator for Buckinghamshire County Council and Adobe Education Leader, exchanging courses with Roxana Hadad in Chicago. Speakers appear via webcam, using interactive whiteboards and with instant messaging feedback from the students.

Mat was able to speak to students from schools in the Chicago area, including J. Sterling Morton East, Morton Freshman Center and Roosevelt High School, showing them satellite images of their own city, as well as Washington and the UK, and discussed with them what these images can tell us about our environment.

Mat explained, “I think this is an exciting area for teaching development - we were using Adobe Connect as the connection tool, and I was impressed. I've used text-based stuff before, but not real-time video (from my back garden office!).”

See: http://www.adobe.com/education/community/k12/leaders/

The course Roxana taught on is documented at http://www.futurelab.org.uk/resources/publications-reports-articles/web-articles/Web-Article1748

The Chicago UBMS program site is at: http://ubms.neiu.edu/

 

Audio Slideshow

Click here to view an audio slideshow in which Mat explains in more detail how the students responded to some of the satellite images he presented.