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Critique of ‘fortress conservation’ at sea turned out to be more accurate than had been foreseen?
  
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Critique of ‘fortress conservation’ at sea turned out to be more accurate than had been foreseen?

Wikileak confirms suspicions of conservationists

Critique of ‘fortress conservation’ at sea turned out to be more accurate than had been foreseen?

A recent paper, to which Dr Peter Jones contributed, critiqued the decision to designate a 210,000 square mile area around the Chagos archipelago in the Indian Ocean as a no-take marine protected area in which all fishing is banned. This critique was on the grounds that the designation neglected critical social justice issue related to the potential for Chagos islanders to return to the islands, following their earlier eviction by the UK Government to make way for the Diego Garcia military base. It coined the term ‘fortress conservation’, which turned out to be particularly and unfortunately appropriate in the light of the recent 'Wikileak'. This revealed that the UK and US governments had indeed agreed to designate the Chagos marine protected area principally as a means of foreclosing the option of the evicted islanders being able to return to the island, so ensuring its continued use as a military base. A hearing in the European Court of Justice is pending to see whether the continued exclusion of the previous residents of the Chagos islands is legal under Human Rights law..

See Guardian: http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/dec/03/wikileaks-cables-diego-garcia-uk

UCL Department of Geography